Here are some articles that have been published regarding our work with the UA Dog study. 

Dog bacteria might benefit human health

Fido’s licks and tummy rubs just might be good for your health. Arizona researchers are studying the biological connection between humans and dogs that could be shared through saliva, skin, and even feces. Click here to read more. 

Heal Fido: Dog could be a gut's best friend

Greek yogurt and kimchee may enhance digestion and gut health, but a canine roommate could be even better. Read more here

Study: Do Slobbery Dog Kisses Lead to Better Human Health? 

A new study aims to prove that living with dogs produces better gut bacteria, and in turn better health and well-being. Continue reading. 

Man's BestFriend Also Man's Best Medicine? Dogs May Have Probiotic Effect On Gut Bacteria

Dogs are known for a sense of smell so powerful it can detect danger and diseases in humans. Often guard dogs and companions, we consider them our best friend. But as an upcoming study from the University of Arizona aims to prove, dogs may also be man's best medicine. Learn more here

Could a kiss from your dog be good for you? Canine germs may act " as a probiotic", experts say. 

It is well documented that owning a dog boosts a person's wellbeing. But the health benefits of sharing your life with a furry friend may not end there. Click here to learn more.

New Study to Investigate Whether Dog Saliva Can Help With Allergies

It turns out that man's best might also hold a key to lessening those pesky allergic reactions. Click here to read more. 

Could Man's Best Friend Be Man's Best Medicine?

A study of the interaction between humans and dogs is the first for the UA's new Human-Animal Interaction Research Initiative. You can read the full article here.

UA Study Finds Owning a Dog Provides Health Benefits for Postmenopausal Women

Working to identify effective strategies to increase physical activity among older adults, particularly women, University of Arizona researchers have identified dog ownership as a key to better health. Read article here.

Man's Best Friend Also Man's Best Medicine? Dogs May Have Probiotic Effect On Gut Bacteria

Dogs are known for a sense of smell so powerful it can detect danger and diseases in humans. Often guard dogs and companions, we consider them our best friend. But as an upcoming study from UA aims to prove, dogs may also be a man's best medicine. Read more here

Kissing your dog could improve your health, scientists say...

Researchers at the University of Arizona believe microbes in a dog's gut may have a probiotic effect on the human body. Learn more here